Prehistoric Times Magazine (Spring 2013) Reviewed


A Review of Prehistoric Times Magazine (Issue 105)

The weather has at last began to get better and as we say goodbye to the chilly easterly breeze we and say a warm welcome to the spring edition of Prehistoric Times magazine. Yes, spring has finally come and it is marked by the arrival of the spring edition of Prehistoric Times, a magazine that provides news and views on anything and everything to do with prehistoric animals, extinct creatures and of course, dinosaurs.

Marking the 20th Anniversary of the Publication

Issue 105 is the 20th anniversary of the first edition of this quarterly publication. Coincidently, 2013 is also the 20th anniversary of the premier of the dinosaur film “Jurassic Park” and there are special features on both inside this issue. Editor Mike Fredericks provides a potted history of the publication, a fascinating insight into what has become an institution for “dino-philes”. Dotted throughout the article are contributions from other regular writers and it was interesting to read how they met Mike and started to work with him on various projects. The feature entitled “Sketch me a Spitter”, pays homage to Jurassic Park the movie, and renowned artist Mark Hallett recalls his work on the film working as a concept artist and palaeo consultant. There are some wonderful illustrations of the Theropod dinosaurs that appeared in the first of the Jurassic Park trilogy. If you have always wanted to know how the venomous dinosaur that killed the character known as Dennis Nedry, came about then read this article and all will be revealed.

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Special Feature on the Horned Dinosaur Triceratops

The first of the prehistoric animals featured in this issue is Triceratops and the magazine includes lots and lots of artwork sent in by readers. Phil Hore provides a very informative article on this famous horned dinosaur and even Tracy Lee Ford gets in on the act with a superb piece in his long running series “How to Draw Dinosaurs”. The morphology of the skull and horns changed as Ceratopsians got older. He kindly summarises the main points to remember when it comes to illustrating juveniles, mature adults and very old specimens of Triceratops. There is also a rare picture of a Triceratops skull in situ, discovered by the famous palaeontologist George Sternberg in 1908.

Ideas on to Depict Foliage when Making Model Scenes

Amongst the usual items such as correspondence from readers, collectors corner, book reviews and updates on new model introductions, Ron Lemery provides information on a technique known as photoetching, a great way to build detail into dinosaur themed model scenes with the skillful use of foliage. Talking of models, Steven B. DeMarco showcases how to make and paint a fearsome Mosasaur, a marine reptile he aptly refers to as “Mosa Jaws”!

The Fearsome and Highly Deadly Dire Wolf

The second prehistoric animal to feature prominently in this edition of “PT” is the fearsome, highly resourceful Dire Wolf (Canis dirus). Phil Hore writes a very entertaining piece explaining the differences between the Dire Wolf and the Grey Wolf and discusses their fossil record including the exquisitely detailed specimens that have been retrieved from the La Brea Tar pits in Los Angeles (California, USA).

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Prehistoric Animals Featured on Postcards – Collectors Corner

For slightly older dinosaur fans there is a very insightful article written by Allen A. Debus on the beautiful post card illustrations of Neave Parker, a real trip down memory lane when looking at the wonderful black and white illustrations of the various prehistoric animals.

Jam packed full of dinosaur themed goodies, issue 105 of Prehistoric Times is definitely a ” must read” and on this form we can expect this publication to keep on going for at least another twenty years.

Well done to all involved.